News

The ECSE community gathered once again on August 13, 2020 to discuss online learning for the Fall 2020 semester. The Town Hall was intended to share ECSE plans for classes and activities for the hybrid online and in-person Fall 2020 semester.
 
Slides from the Town Hall can be found here.
 

TROY, N.Y. —When the Shewanella oneidensis bacterium “breathes” in certain metal and sulfur compounds anaerobically, the way an aerobic organism would process oxygen, it produces materials that could be used to enhance electronics, electrochemical energy storage, and drug-delivery devices.

The webinar featured Department Head Professor John Wen, Class of 2024 Faculty Advisers Prof. Derya Malak, Prof. Tianyi Chen, Prof. Michael Shur and Prof. Ali Tajer, as well as ECSE First Year Adviser Cara Leath and Undergraduate Student Coordinator Rama Hamarneh.

The ECSE community gathered on July 16, 2020 to discuss online learning for the Fall 2020 semester.

TROY, N.Y. — The state of New York has set an ambitious target of developing and implementing a 100% clean electric grid by the year 2040, with the larger goal of eventual economy-wide carbon-neutrality. New York’s “Green New Deal” will require a multitude of industry and academic research initiatives aimed at making that effort a tangible reality.

TROY, N.Y. — A surgeon makes an incision on a virtual patient with support from a perioperative nurse, while an anesthesiologist monitors the patient’s vital signs. As the procedure continues, the team members navigate together through any challenges that arise — even though each of them may be participating from different rooms, buildings, or even cities.

TROY, N.Y. — Short of cameras, there are few tools at the disposal of health care providers or loved ones to remotely monitor patient safety within hospitals and assisted living care facilities. A new system of infrared sensors is able to provide real-time data about a person’s movements in a room while also maintaining their privacy.

The research, mentorship, and teaching innovation of several faculty members in the School of Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute were recently recognized with the 2020 Institute Awards. The annual honors also included recognition for exceptional service and dedication.

TROY, N.Y. — A device capable of automatically disinfecting common surfaces, such as doorknobs, light switches, and elevator buttons, could be a vital tool in virus and disease mitigation during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Michael Shur, an endowed chair professor of electrical, computer, and systems engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has conceived of a plan to disinfect high-traffic surfaces using deep ultraviolet light from LEDs.

Bob Karlicek, the director of the Center for Lighting Enabled Systems & Applications (LESA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will discuss ultraviolet (UV-C) technology and how it may be used to kill viruses and other pathogens during a webcast, hosted by LEDs Magazine.

This topic has come into focus as one possible solution for preventing and mitigating the COVID-19 pandemic.